HAKUNAMATATA
delacroix:

wonderfulyou:

There are two rules on the spiritual path:
1. Begin 2. Continue
#yogaeverydamnday

That’s the truth.

I’m sore from head to toe from yesterday’s yoga session.

delacroix:

wonderfulyou:

There are two rules on the spiritual path:

1. Begin
2. Continue

#yogaeverydamnday

That’s the truth.

I’m sore from head to toe from yesterday’s yoga session.

how-fascinating:

but-tonightwedance:

felistella:

btothed:

Someday.

 future referencing

ROISIN

YES ALL OF THEM

how-fascinating:

but-tonightwedance:

felistella:

btothed:

Someday.

 future referencing

ROISIN

YES ALL OF THEM

thelovelyloner:

Kid President meets President Obama

This is so perfect.

When the night falls, my lonely heart calls...

Whitney Houston - I Wanna Dance With Somebody
1,165 plays

deathskysofteye:

Whitney Houston // I Wanna Dance With Somebody

Hell yeah.

all day

all day

psych-facts:

For more psychology facts, myths or quotes.


Mylife.org
definitelydope:

Lupine Cottage (by Nate Parker Photography)
Last night was mad real

Last night was mad real

anarcho-queer:

FBI To Make Surveillance of Emails, Online Chat In Real Time A “Top Priority” In 2013
Despite the pervasiveness of law enforcement surveillance of digital communication, the FBI still has a difficult time monitoring Gmail, Google Voice, and Dropbox in real time. But that may change soon, because the bureau says it has made gaining more powers to wiretap all forms of Internet conversation and cloud storage a “top priority” this year.
Last week, during a talk for the American Bar Association in Washington, D.C., FBI general counsel Andrew Weissmann discussed some of the pressing surveillance and national security issues facing the bureau. He gave a few updates on the FBI’s efforts to address what it calls the “going dark” problem—how the rise in popularity of email and social networks has stifled its ability to monitor communications as they are being transmitted. It’s no secret that under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the feds can easily obtain archive copies of emails. When it comes to spying on emails or Gchat in real time, however, it’s a different story.
That’s because a 1994 surveillance law called the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act only allows the government to force Internet providers and phone companies to install surveillance equipment within their networks. But it doesn’t cover email, cloud services, or online chat providers like Skype. Weissmann said that the FBI wants the power to mandate real-time surveillance of everything from Dropbox and online games (“the chat feature in Scrabble”) to Gmail and Google Voice. “Those communications are being used for criminal conversations,” he said.
The FBI is not happy with the current arrangement and is on a crusade for more surveillance authority. According to Weissmann, the bureau is working with “members of intelligence community” to craft a proposal for new Internet spy powers as “a top priority this year.” Citing security concerns, he declined to reveal any specifics. “It’s a very hard thing to talk about publicly,” he said, though acknowledged that “it’s something that there should be a public debate about.”

anarcho-queer:

FBI To Make Surveillance of Emails, Online Chat In Real Time A “Top Priority” In 2013

Despite the pervasiveness of law enforcement surveillance of digital communication, the FBI still has a difficult time monitoring Gmail, Google Voice, and Dropbox in real time. But that may change soon, because the bureau says it has made gaining more powers to wiretap all forms of Internet conversation and cloud storage a “top priority” this year.

Last week, during a talk for the American Bar Association in Washington, D.C., FBI general counsel Andrew Weissmann discussed some of the pressing surveillance and national security issues facing the bureau. He gave a few updates on the FBI’s efforts to address what it calls the “going dark” problem—how the rise in popularity of email and social networks has stifled its ability to monitor communications as they are being transmitted. It’s no secret that under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the feds can easily obtain archive copies of emails. When it comes to spying on emails or Gchat in real time, however, it’s a different story.

That’s because a 1994 surveillance law called the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act only allows the government to force Internet providers and phone companies to install surveillance equipment within their networks. But it doesn’t cover email, cloud services, or online chat providers like Skype. Weissmann said that the FBI wants the power to mandate real-time surveillance of everything from Dropbox and online games (“the chat feature in Scrabble”) to Gmail and Google Voice. “Those communications are being used for criminal conversations,” he said.

The FBI is not happy with the current arrangement and is on a crusade for more surveillance authority. According to Weissmann, the bureau is working with “members of intelligence community” to craft a proposal for new Internet spy powers as “a top priority this year.” Citing security concerns, he declined to reveal any specifics. “It’s a very hard thing to talk about publicly,” he said, though acknowledged that “it’s something that there should be a public debate about.